Thursday, June 4, 2015

Akagi Chapters 244 & 245

It's time to serve up a double release of Akagi! How will Washizu take the events of last chapter?!

Thanks to Crump for the cleans and to Tambur for the typesetting. I will not be at mahjong night this Saturday at 3:00 PM PST, but I will be trying out a new idea of mine on stream this Sunday at 2:00 PM PST.

Chapter 244
Chapter 245

"I'll admit, I am fascinated by this man who thinks he's invincible!"


Yeah, I don't know how I was expecting Washizu to take this, but it certainly wasn't this way. Not only does he not stay shocked and mortified for very long, but he actually CONGRATULATES Akagi on fooling him. But at the same time, he doesn't seem to think he's lost. He and Akagi both seem confident that he will be able to recover after losing 800 more ccs for a total of 1900. This in spite of Washizu being almost entirely certain that Akagi would die at just 1800 ccs when it happened.

All that aside though, I think Washizu's henchmen are completely out of line to insist that Washizu should just stop here without having his blood drawn. Yes, I'm aware that this is Washizu's death we're talking about, but the man just went from being one of the wealthiest men in the country to being dirt poor in a single night and was willing to put his life on the line to both get his money back and to beat Akagi. To now say that Washizu doesn't need to lose his blood is a complete disservice to the match that Akagi and Washizu both bet their lives on.

I'm something of a gambler myself, so maybe my mindset is a bit skewed, but if I were betting my life in a game and I knew full well that my opponent would not hesitate to kill me when my points ran out, you bet that I would make my opponent hold up their end of the agreement, even if that meant watching them die. I know it's not nice, but gambling itself is not nice. If you want to make money gambling, you have to understand that all your money will be taken away from someone else. And if you lose, you have to be prepared to give up what you owe, even if that means you won't have enough money to live. Or in this case, giving up your life itself.

Even so, I feel like a lot of gamblers in Washizu's position would try and back out of it somehow. Take Muraoka from Kaiji, who lost his home and his life savings to Kaiji and fought until the very end to get out of it, employing every tactic he could think of. When he finally realized that there was no way of getting out of it, he actually wet himself in fear. I feel like people mock Muraoka for that a lot, but really that's the natural human reaction to losing everything, whether it's in a game or because of some crime you committed or in war. Once reality strikes, it's natural to try and get out of it. So I understand the mindset of wanting to avoid losing everything, and I don't blame anyone who took the side of the white suits when reading this.

But that said, Washizu's reaction is correct. Just because losing your life and your money is a lot to take in doesn't make it any less real. HE was the one that accepted the bet, and when he accepted it he had to have been prepared for the worst case. Once you've accepted it and gone through to the end, it's too late to back out.

And besides, what kind of life would Washizu have if he backed out now? He would have lost all his money, been on the run from the law for his murder charges, and those white suits that were all encouraging him to do it would probably go find someone with more money. He would have no money, no home, no friends, and possibly worst of all no self-respect. So really, besides the issue of pride, it only makes sense for him to bite the bullet and take one last gamble to try and win it all back.

Man, I've written a lot here and I haven't even gotten to the part where Washizu lists off all his henchmen's names and all their reactions to that. I could go on for much longer about that, but instead I think I'll end it with one final note. As you can tell my view of gambling is very cut-and-dry, and I might describe my outlook on it as pretty brutal. But I think Akagi is actually softer than that. Rather than telling him to take it like a man, Akagi told Washizu to see if he could make it back. That means Akagi still thinks Washizu might survive. He's a gambler so of course he's going to make Washizu hold up his end of the deal, but he's still not telling him to die. I think he wants Washizu to come back. He knows that he has to kill him for real if he does, but his human side is still telling him he wants to see the man in front of him live, if only for a few more minutes. I'll leave it at that for now.

15 comments:

  1. "A man that treats an agreement like trash would no longer be Washizu Iwao!"
    I can't be the only one who was reminded of Akagi in Ten when Washizu said this

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    1. I was going to say the exact same thing. This moment might have left a deep impression on Akagi. I think the "see if you can make it back" is a reaction to Washizu's resolve.

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  2. Oh man, a double release! Thank you thank you thank you!

    I think Akagi is having fun and wants to keep playing... but even if Washizu does survive the blood loss, it doesn't seem like he'll play well.

    I'm really curious about what'll happen next!

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  3. I don't think Akagi could really see this as a win if Washizu dies.

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  4. SO GOOD. Thank you for doing something that adds so much joy to my life!

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  5. What's the score?

    What's the score.

    If Washizu survives and manages to avoid dealing in in the 4th

    How much blood will be taken from Akagi?

    In terms of points

    What's the score?

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    1. The score is irrelevant at this point, both of them lost so much blood that any blood loss is enough to kill them.

      If there is a 4th round it will be a sudden death match.

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    2. But if the round ends with Washizu's partner winning, then there will be no exchange and Akagi will have the points drawn from him

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    3. The game has 10-30 uma, which means that a single placement difference between Akagi and Washizu is worth 20000 points, or 2000 ccs. Instant death. So if it goes to south 4th, Akagi either has to kill Washizu with a bonus payment, or overtake him in points.

      Going into the South 3rd round, the point diffrence between them was 55000 so now it's 39000. To overtake that without taking points from Washizu, Akagi would need to score a double yakuman off of Yasuoka or Suzuki. It's logical to assume he's aiming for a bonus snipe instead.

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  6. R.I.P. Washizu, it was a long run, a fitting end to the Akagi manga.

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  7. 29 more chapters to catch up, 274 just came out yesterday in Japan.

    We can do this.

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  8. I didn't think I would read something even better then what happened in kaiji manga the 3rd one, when the president wet himself and begged for his life, this was much better IMHO, and what made these two chapter even more good is what you Sonickrazy said about these chapters, thanks a lot for your hard work.

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  9. I had the same thoughts about the white suits, but then i realized that they were against this match from the very start, even before it started they tried to convince Washizu to stop this madness

    Since they were against it from the start they don't have any moral obligation to upheld the terms they didn't agree with in the first place, after all Washizu has the last say in it.

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    Replies
    1. don't forget that from akagi side the cap and that guy ohige or whatever his name is, they where more likely to accept this surrender, but the main 2 character here didn't want to stop and they want to see this matter finish to the point where one of them is dead.

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